• स्वाति जैन

    Amen!!! May our society adapt to adopted children…one can adopt regardless of having or not biological child….
    and kids are just kids…whether they are ones with LD or special needs…its our perspective on how to see and treat them and it makes a whole lot of difference in their upbringing…:)
    God bless all…

    • Dr Chander Asrani

      Right Swati. Many of them miss out on the pleasure of parenting for fear of public reaction

  • Yamini Vijendran

    Thanks for that Doctor. Sometimes we just forget every child is unique and try to fit them all into the same stereotype… By the way, the symptom you mentioned – doing well in rhymes and recitation but not ready to write… I see that with my son sometimes… He is just about 3, and of course, I have not forced him too much to get down to writing till now. Should I be concerned? Also, by what age should we start getting concerned?

    • Dr Chander Asrani

      If he can not reproduce what you show him or cannot decipher written word u may consult a professional. When? Since u are aware I leave it to your judgement. When u feel he should be doing it but cannot. A consultation won’t harm.

      • Yamini Vijendran

        Thanks doctor. I am also planning to have a chat with his teachers about it and then take further steps as required. I forgot to mention in my previous comment – loved the way you seamlessly interwove the issues of adoption and LD and brought out the message with such clarity. 🙂

        • Dr Chander Asrani

          Thanks, Yamini

    • ParentEdge

      Hi Yamini – Three is much too young for a child to pick up writing in any case. At this age, they are just about learning to grip a pencil right! A child is typically ready to start writing only at the age of four or more, though a lot of traditional schools in India do get them started on it earlier. I would strongly encourage you to first read up about writing skills – I suspect you will find that there is nothing to worry about!
      Kritika
      http://www.parentedge.in

  • ParentEdge

    Great post Dr. Asrani. The good news is, that in urban areas at least to begin with, awareness of these learning disabilities seems to be increasing. Parents are more aware of LDs like dyslexia, dyspraxia, dyscalculia, etc. Each issue of our magazine has a feature that focuses on children with learning disabilities and I am heartened to note that parents of children we interview seem to be quite matter-of-fact about a learning disability. They do not allow it to hamper the child’s development in any way and merely put in extra effort and invest more time with their children to help them out. And more mainstream schools are also gradually accepting children with learning disabilities, and in many cases, also making special provisions for them in terms of extra coaching, aids to learning, etc. If every parent realised that a child with a learning disability is perfectly normal with average or above-average intelligence, but just with certain difficulties in comprehending and processing certain kinds of information, they wouldn’t be so quick to despair.
    Kritika Srinivasan
    http://www.parentedge.in

    • Dr Chander Asrani

      Hi! Kritika
      Heartening to learn that you are doing such yeoman services. I feel a lot depends on the professional/ person who conveys the news first time. The approach, ease of detailing, unbiased information and a positive outlook. Conveying that nothing is wrong (not necessarily in words). This is one time I wouldn’t want a parent to get depressed with unfounded information.
      Would definitely visit ur site to know more about what you do.

  • Muneera Mohammed Ali

    Thanks for the great post, Dr Asrani! I’m somewhat convinced my son is dyslexic. He can learn songs and rhymes easily enough, but when it comes to writing and learning with a capital L, I must say he’s weak. He comes home with incomplete notes most of the time. He never remembers to do his home work, forgets to keep his timetable according to the teacher’s request and can never bring himself to pick up his book and seriously study unless I nag him to it. He is eleven years old, by the way, and my younger son. I often wonder where I went wrong. You see, I developed encephalitis a few months after he was born and so at first I didn’t even remember having him. It took a while for me to take up my parenting role after I recovered. But I did it anyway, and even resumed breast feeding after the doctor said it was OK. And then I must admit I was a bit young. I had got married at the age of eighteen, my elder son was born when I was nineteen and the younger one, Rizwan, was born when I was twenty. I was also living with my in-laws. I don’t know what has contributed to his poor performance. It saddens me at times. Many people advice me that he will catch up as he grows older. And sometimes, I can’t help wondering if it’s just laziness and irresponsibility on his part. And sometimes, I feel I should not bother him too much about studies and just let him enjoy his childhood. What do you think, Doctor? Please advise.
    Muneera Mohammed Ali
    Bahrain